FLC Road Show

Last week, as an add-on lunch event at the Making Learning Accessible conference, my FLC did a brown bag presentation on accessibility, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and our D2L training course for faculty. We easily had 100 people attend, which was amazing, and we were able to share our message with a number of MSU faculty that we had yet to reach. Additionally, since we piggy-backed on the conference, we had a number of non-MSU folks in the audience as well, and we received really great feedback and discussion points from both populations of attendees.

read more

Transcripts versus Captions

Today I participated in a Lunch and Learn event at the Center for Language Teaching Advancement on designing accessible course materials. It was run by Kate Sonka and Dustin Defelise. It was a very interesting group because members ranged from undergraduates with little knowledge or experience in accessibility to those, like me, that have spent a decent amount of time creating accessible content to others that have a detailed knowledge of the WCAG 2.0 standards. I love when discussions involve a wide range of experiences and backgrounds.

read more

Online MA/Grad Cert Collaboration Meeting

This morning Leigh Graves Wolf from the MSU Hub for Innovation in Learning and Technology organized a collaborative meeting with directors of online and hybrid Masters and Graduate Certificate programs at MSU. It was the first time this group had ever met in one location. The group varied from individuals that manage programs that have been successful for years to people like me who are in the process of creating new programs to those who have yet to start the process of program creation. Strengths and weakness were discussed, some solutions were found, partnerships were formed, resources were shared. Everyone agreed these meetings should continue in the future.

read more

Brain Bee at MSU

The 2017 Brain Bee at MSU will take place on Sunday, February 5. The Brain Bee at MSU is a competition for high school students and test their knowledge of neuroscience facts based on the free PDF Brain Facts. Registration is now open for all Michigan high school students between the ages of 13-18. The winner of the competition at MSU moves on to compete at the National Brain Bee, and possibly the International Brain Bee. Participation is also great for college applications.

read more

COETC

I spent the morning at the 33rd Annual MSU College of Education Technology Conference. The theme of this year’s conference was equity in STEM, Computer Science, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). The first talk I attended was presented by Nate Stevenson from Kent State on designing accessible learning with UDL. We discussed the principles of UDL and about how to think about if content creates barriers to learning for your students. For example, for some students get overwhelmed by the simple length of an assignment. This hit close to home because I tend to combine multiple assignments into one in my online classes. I am now going to reevaluate this decision. He also mentioned the book Design and Deliver by Loui Lord Nelson, which is a book I’d like to check out.

read more

Accessibility Presentation

This week some members of my FLC presented at an MSU Academic Advancement Network (AAN; formerly FOD) Teaching and Learning seminar (formerly Lilly seminars). We had a great group of participants. I have recently been introduced to the idea of sketchnotes – where you draw your notes instead of simply writing words (think, infographic style). I am interested in learning more about this process, but I am also hesitant because I am rarely happy with my illustrations the first time through, and they do take me some time to complete. Combine that with the fact that I haven’t played much with combining text and drawing on my tablet, and there is going to be a learning curve.

read more

Quality Matters – Standard 2

In our most recent Colleges Online Workgroup, we examined standard 2 of the Quality Matters rubric – learning objectives. One of the discussion we had was the use of jargon in a learning objective – is it appropriate or not? Some feel jargon can confuse a student and may lead to misinterpretation of the objective, while others feel that using jargon in the right context is a necessary step toward becoming an expert in a field, and so by using it in a learning objective, we are modeling appropriate and effective use for students. QM suggests not using jargon, but I have come across some instances where jargon is the best word for a situation.

read more

Tweets